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Child Abuse and Domestic Violence

Child abuse and domestic violence are tangled together. Women sometimes stay in an unhappy relationship for the kids. If their partner’s emotionally abusive, they try to keep him calmed down so he’s ranting and acting like a jackass when the children aren’t around. If he’s physically abusive and sneaky, he’ll leave marks where they’re not so obvious– broken ribs or a head held under water. There’s no limit to the imagination of an abusive man.

Joe Torre, former professional baseball player and manager of the Los Angeles Dodgers, grew up with a physically abusive father. “I did not get physically abused myself. I grew up in fear because my mom did. I was shy and he would make fun of me. Whenever I saw my dad’s car in the driveway, I didn’t want to go home.” On Joe’s website, Safe at Home, you’ll find a video. Joe tells of his early life growing up in a violent home.

Joe’s Safe at Home Foundation recently opened an office on the west coast. There are currently eleven Margaret’s Place sites– safe abuse-free havens for middle and high school students. This first west coast program is in Los Angeles. Hopefully, it will spread north along the whole west coast. All children deserve a safe room where they can talk to each other and a professional counselor. If you’re in Los Angeles, or one of the cities up the coast, see how you can join or help start a new program in your area.

Molly Brown, DMS

"
Feminism and Catholic Nuns" is on my other blog, Lyn's Circle.

Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
(Anonymous)
May. 18th, 2012 07:34 pm (UTC)
In response to Child Abuse and Domestic Violence
Once again, Lynn, you've you've brought to the reader's attention a very real problem that is not addressed often enough.

When women stay in an abusive relationship for the sake of the children, there intention is misguided and it does nothing to put an end to a cycle of violence. At the same time, when children are abused and are not then protected, their self-esteem is damaged, their mental health suffers,and the message that they are being given is that's how they can be expected to be treated in the future.

The more options we, as a society, are able to offer to such women and the more we educate them and their children, the less power men will have over them and the healthier they and their children have a chance of becoming.

There are any number of safe houses and hotlines for such women to call and use as resources. No one - a grown woman or her children - deserves to suffer abuse. The trauma to the mother and children is irreparable but, it's just such cycles that we must interrupt.

Again, Lynn, your social consciousness is admirable and thanks for adressing this ever-growing problem.

Linda Appleman Shapiro,
Psychotherapist/Addictions Counselor/Author
(Anonymous)
May. 18th, 2012 07:39 pm (UTC)
In response to Child Abuse and Domestic Violence
Once again, Lynn, you've you've brought to the reader's attention a very real problem that is not addressed often enough.

When women stay in an abusive relationship for the sake of the children, there intention is misguided and it does nothing to put an end to a cycle of violence. At the same time, when children are abused and are not then protected, their self-esteem is damaged, their mental health suffers,and they assume that they have no choice other than to expect to be treated abusively.

The more options we, as a society, are able to offer to such women and the more we educate them and their children, the less power men will have over them and the healthier they and their children have a chance of becoming.

There are any number of safe houses and hotlines for such women to call and use as resources. No one - a grown woman or her children - deserves to suffer abuse. The trauma to the mother and childrren is one that has already set a cycle into motion and it's just such cycles that we MUST interrupt.

Again,Lynn, your social consciousness is admirable and thanks for adressing this ever-growing problem.

Linda Appleman Shapiro,
Psychotherapist/Addictions Counselor/Author
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )